LCS Philosophy Group                  Bill Schrader Pavillon 3/6/2015

As a treat for our last meeting till the fall, I have found a lovely 2009 lecture by Michael Saunders at the LSE, on “Justice and the Moral Limits of Markets”:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nhvH0WbZl9o&list=PL6564D12F890C179B&index=4

The lecture explores three schools of economic justice;  utilitarianism, libertarianism, and limited libertarianism.

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In addition, I refer you to an excellent article explaining the math and the physics of Einstein’s view that gravity is not a force, but a curve in space time:

http://curious.astro.cornell.edu/about-us/140-physics/the-theory-of-relativity/general-relativity/1059-if-gravity-isn-t-a-force-how-does-it-accelerate-objects-advanced

The author has one term that combines 16 variables and adds the space/time effect to a Newtonian Analysis.  He does not explain this term’s math, only its consequences.  Einstein’s theory is now about 100 years old, and this math – essential to understanding what he really said – is not widely known.  In other words, frontier science can only be an amusement for most of us, we do not have the knowledge to participate in the science.  On the other hand, even scientists only have participatory knowledge on a relatively minute area.  So, as citizens, all of us have to assess rationally the consequences of scientific findings.

How comfortable does that make you?

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Lastly, for summer thinking, I recommend yet another long talk, by Hedrick Smith, on his book; “Who Stole the American Dream”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7tLped6GFGA

Smith comes to the startling conclusion that our current economic misery is the result of a decades -long, planned attack by the very rich and the very powerful.  Or as Warren Buffet said (with regret):

“There’s class warfare, all right, but it’s my class, the rich class, that’s making war, and we’re winning.”

◦As quoted in “In Class Warfare, Guess Which Class Is Winning” by Ben Stein, in The New York Times (26 November 2006)

Both talk, and book, are compelling.

Have a good summer!

Clear thinking

Roger

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